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  • The Latest on the concert bombing in England (all times local): 7:15 p.m. American singer Ariana Grande says she will return to Manchester for a benefit concert to raise money for attack victims and their families. A suicide bomber killed 22 people and wounded scores of others minutes after Grande's concert at the Manchester Arena ended on Monday night. Grande tweeted a statement that says 'I'll be returning to the incredibly brave city of Manchester to spend time with my fans and to have a benefit concert in honor of and to raise money for the victims and their families.' She said details are still being finalized and she will 'have details to share ... as soon as everything is confirmed.' Grande also said 'my heart, prayers and deepest condolences are with the victims of the Manchester attack and their loved ones.' ___ 5:10 p.m. The police chief in Manchester says there has been an increase in reported hate crimes since the suicide bombing at a pop concert in the city. Greater Manchester Police Chief Ian Hopkins said Friday there is no place for discrimination and hatred in Manchester and urged people to report any incidents. Hopkins said he has reached out to faith leaders to try to calm the situation. He also says there has been a lot of progress in the investigation, but much work remains to be done. Hopkins says 12 locations are still being searched. ___ 4:55 p.m. The mother of Martyn Hett, who was one of the 22 people killed in Monday's Manchester suicide bombing, says she feels no hate or anger toward the suspected attacker. She's taking solace knowing her son died doing something he loved. Figen Murray said in an interview Friday that the 22-year-old British man named as the bombing suspect doesn't deserve her energy. Murray says: 'I'm staying with my positivity for Martyn, and that's what I hold on to.' Hett, who was 29 years old, was believed to have been at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester Arena with a friend. His mother says she treasures a selfie a woman took with her son at the show and the woman's message that 'he loved being there' and 'really enjoyed himself.' Murray says, 'You know he died, and his last moments were experiencing what he enjoyed, so that's you know...' Hett had a large social media following and was remembered for taking to Twitter to promote his mother's stall at a craft fair after she told him that no one was buying anything. The appeal led to many people buying his mother's knitted products ___ 4:28 p.m. A British train company says that a station in Manchester damaged in Monday's bombing attack will remain closed for the foreseeable future. Northern rail said Friday that Manchester Victoria Station 'suffered structural damage that still needs to be properly assessed and repaired. Until the work is completed, the station will remain closed.' The station directly links to Manchester Arena, where a British man of Libyan descent exploded a suicide bomb that killed 22 people and wounded scores of others after an Ariana Grande concert. Northern Railway says train services 'that would normally run into Manchester Victoria are unable to do so,' meaning 'significant disruption' for trains in and around Manchester. ___ 3:55 p.m. Members of the mosque attended by the Manchester suicide bombing suspect have been warned that police will be informed if there are signs anyone in the community has been radicalized. Manchester Islamic Centre board of trustees director Mohammad el-Khayat used a sermon before Friday afternoon prayers to strongly condemn the attack at the Manchester Arena that killed 22 people. Police have identified a 22-year-old man who used to attend the mosque, Salman Abedi, as the bomber. El-Khayat said: 'If we are radicalizing people, who god-forbidden, have any intention to do (harm), the police will be the first to know.' Speaking to reporters outside the mosque, El-Khayat said, 'We do not radicalize people.' El-Khayat acknowledged there had been concerns in past at the mosque about leaflets containing extremist views. ___ 3:20 p.m. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the United States takes 'full responsibility' for the leaking of information from Britain's investigation of the Manchester concert bombing. Tillerson said during a trip to London on Friday that the U.S. 'regrets' the leaks, which British officials complained had led to the publication of sensitive information. The breach prompted the U.K. to briefly stop sharing information about the bombing inquiry with the U.S. British Prime Minister Theresa May spoke with U.S. President Donald Trump about the disclosures on Thursday. Information-sharing resumed after U.S. officials said evidence would be protected. Tillerson said Friday that the 'special relationship that exists between our two countries will certainly withstand this particular unfortunate event.' ___ 2:20 p.m. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has paid tribute to the victims of the Manchester Arena bombing that killed 22 people and left dozens wounded. During a joint appearance with British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson in London on Friday, Tillerson said that 'the thirst for justice burns very hot' and promised to drive terrorists and extremists 'out of our communities' and off the face of the earth. ___ 11:55 a.m. The leader of Britain's opposition Labour Party says there is a link between Britain's actions overseas and the increased extremist threat at home. Jeremy Corbyn spoke as campaigning for the June 8 general election resumed after a three-day pause following the concert hall bombing in Manchester, in which 22 people died. Corbyn says many experts including British intelligence professionals see a connection between terrorism and the wars Britain has supported, such as the one in Libya. ___ 11:10 a.m. Former Oasis frontman Liam Gallagher has announced plans for a benefit concert in Manchester to help victims of the extremist bombing that killed 22 people. The Manchester native said on Twitter he will perform a solo show Tuesday at the 02 Ritz in Manchester. Profits will go to a fund for the families of the victims. Gallagher had earlier tweeted about his love for the city and said there were 'no words' that could describe the tragedy. ___ 10:00 a.m. London police say extra security is being added for major sporting events this weekend including the FA Cup Final at Wembley Stadium. Chief Superintendent Jon Williams said Friday that extra protection measures and extra officers are being deployed throughout the capital because of the higher terrorist-threat level. He said fans coming to football and rugby matches this weekend should come earlier than usual because of added security screening. Williams said 'covert and discrete tactics' will also be employed to protect the transport network. He says police want the approach to be 'unpredictable' and to make London 'as hostile an environment as possible to terrorists.' ___ 8:00 a.m. British police investigating the Manchester Arena bombing have made a new arrest while continuing to search addresses associated with the bomber who killed 22 people. Seven other men are in custody in connection with Monday's blast, with police and security agencies working to prevent further attacks. Their ages ranged from 18 to 38. All are being held on suspicion of offenses violating the terrorism act. A 16-year-old boy who had been arrested has been released without charge, police said. Britain's security level has been upgraded to 'critical' meaning officials believe another attack may be imminent. .
  • Crews have part of Interstate 75 northbound shutdown at Delk Road for a serious wreck. Channel 2's Ross Cavitt is at the scene and says firefighters are trying to rescue the driver of the car that went under the tractor-trailer. Firefighters trying to rescue driver of car under a semi on I-75 near Delk; both NB and SB slowed on already nasty traffic day. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/AiAMWyr5kM-- Ross Cavitt | WSB-TV (@RossCavittWSB) May 26, 2017 Several lanes of the interstate have been shut down on both sides while police investigate the wreck. Triple Team Traffic says only the two lanes of I-75 NB are open at this point. Stay with WSBTV.com and tune into Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. for updates on this developing story. #GRIDLOCK ALERT: Multi-Vehicle Tractor Trailer Crash: I-75/nb at Delk Rd; only two left lanes open delays; https://t.co/YULjFukFkK pic.twitter.com/DEhAFDlwh2-- Triple Team Traffic (@WSBTraffic) May 26, 2017
  • Investigators are focusing on a series of meetings held by Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and an influential White House adviser, as part of their probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and related matters, according to people familiar with the investigation. Kushner, who held meetings in December with the Russian ambassador and a banker from Moscow , is being investigated because of the extent and nature of his interactions with the Russians, the people said. The Washington Post reported last week that a senior White House official close to the president was a significant focus of the high-stakes investigation, though it did not name Kushner. FBI agents also remain keenly interested in former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn and former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, but Kushner is the only current White House official known to be considered a key person in the probe. The Post has not been told that Kushner is a target — or the central focus — of the investigation, and he has not been accused of any wrongdoing. ?>> 6 things to know about Jared Kushner “Mr. Kushner previously volunteered to share with Congress what he knows about these meetings. He will do the same if he is contacted in connection with any other inquiry,” said Jamie Gorelick, one of his attorneys. In addition to possible coordination between the Kremlin and the Trump campaign to influence the 2016 presidential election, investigators are also looking broadly into possible financial crimes — but the people familiar with the matter, who were not authorized to speak publicly, did not specify who or what was being examined. Sarah Isgur Flores, a Justice Department spokeswoman, said, “I can’t confirm or deny the existence or non-existence of investigations or subjects of investigations.” The FBI declined to comment. At the time of the December meetings, Trump already had won the election. Contacts between people on the transition team and foreign governments can be routine, but the meetings and phone calls with the Russians were not made public at the time. In early December, Kushner met in New York with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak, and he later sent a deputy to meet with Kislyak again. Flynn was also present at the early December meeting, and later that month, Flynn held a call with Kislyak to discuss U.S.-imposed sanctions against Russia. Flynn initially mischaracterized the conversation even to the vice president — which ultimately prompted his ouster from the White House. ?>> Jared Kushner's sister woos China's 'golden visa' investors Kushner also met in December with Sergey Gorkov, the head of Vnesheconombank, which has been the subject of U.S. sanctions following Russia’s annexation of Crimea and its support of separatists in eastern Ukraine. In addition to the December meetings, a former senior intelligence official said FBI agents had been looking closely at earlier exchanges between Trump associates and the Russians dating back to the spring of 2016, including one at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington. Kushner and Kislyak — along with close Trump adviser and current Attorney General Jeff Sessions — were present at an April 2016 event at the Mayflower where then-candidate Trump promised in a speech to seek better relations with Russia. It is unclear whether Kushner and Kislyak interacted there. The New York Times reported that Kushner omitted from security clearance forms his December meetings with Kislyak and Gorkov, though his lawyer said that was mere error and he told the FBI soon after that he would amend the forms. The White House said that his meetings were normal and inconsequential. Kushner has agreed to discuss his Russian contacts with the Senate Intelligence Committee — which is conducting one of several investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. In many ways, Kushner is a unique figure inside the White House. He is arguably the president’s most trusted adviser, and he is also a close member of the president’s family. His list of policy responsibilities is vast— his foreign policy portfolio alone includes Canada and Mexico, China, and peace in the Middle East — yet he rarely speaks publicly about any of them. ?>> Miffed neighbors say Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner have 'ruined the neighborhood' Former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III is now leading the probe into possible coordination between the Kremlin and the Trump campaign, and he has set up shop in the Patrick Henry Building in downtown D.C. Even before he was picked by Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosentein to take over the case, investigators had been stepping up their efforts — issuing subpoenas and looking to conduct interviews, people familiar with the matter said. A small group of lawmakers known as the Gang of Eight was recently notified of the change in tempo and focus in the investigation at a classified briefing. It is unclear exactly how Mueller’s leadership will affect the direction of the probe. This week, Justice Department ethics experts cleared him to take over the case even though lawyers at his former firm, WilmerHale, represent several people who could be caught up in the matter, including Kushner, Manafort and Trump’s daughter Ivanka, who is married to Kushner. Mueller resigned from the firm to take over the investigation. Investigators are continuing to look aggressively into the dealings of Flynn, and a grand jury in Alexandria, Va., recently issued a subpoenas for records related to Flynn’s businesses and finances, according to people familiar with the matter. Flynn’s company, the Flynn Intel Group, was paid more than $500,000 by a company owned by a Turkish American businessman close to top Turkish officials for research on Fethullah Gulen, a cleric who Turkey’s current president believes was responsible for a coup attempt last summer. Flynn retroactively registered with the Justice Department in March as a paid foreign agent for Turkish interests. Separately from the probe now run by Mueller, Flynn is being investigated by the Pentagon’s top watchdog for his foreign payments. Flynn also received $45,000 to appear in 2015 with Russian President Vladimir Putin at a dinner for RT, a Kremlin-controlled media organization.
  • Eight expectant mothers in Bluffton, South Carolina, are all eight months pregnant and it may be due in part to Hurricane Matthew, which hit the state in October 2016.  People reported that for some of the mothers, the timing just happened to line up with the storm. “I feel babies always come at a time when they are most needed. When he is born, I feel he will fill a hole in our lives we didn’t even know was missing. I’m so eager and excited to meet him,” one mother said. >> Read more trending news “After trying for a year and a half, it was our first month on fertility medication, and it worked,” another mother said. Another expectant mother told People that she and her partner “decided to leave it in God’s hands if it was the right time for us or not (to get pregnant) and I guess he thought it was.” For photographer Cassie Clayshulte, a surge of expectant mothers and newborns was no surprise. “Nine months after a holiday, blackout or storm is always a very, very busy time for me,” she told “Today”. Clayshulte used that knowledge to being a Facebook search for “hurricane mamas.” According to “Today,” Clayshulte put out a call on her business’ Facebook page March 6 for a photo shoot that shows “beautiful things always come from not so beautiful things!” Mothers Danielle Lewis, Lindsey Binkley, Taylor Pait, Lindsey Gullett, Brittany Day, Kayla Sumler, Savanna Dorsey and Molly Spears all posed with their bumps in two photo shoots -- one at a nature preserve in town and another on a beach at Hilton Head Island. “If it weren’t for Matthew, these eight couples wouldn’t be expecting these little miracles,”  Clayshulte told ABC News. “Some of these couples had trouble conceiving, experienced difficult previous pregnancies, and even had to undergo several rounds of fertility treatments to become pregnant. This storm destroyed trees and property and our area’s tourism industry took a big hit, but the storm helped these couples create something even more beautiful and these stunning mommies-to-be are living proof.” A follow-up newborn shoot is planned for the babies -- seven girls and one boy -- who are due in June. “I want to go back to the same beach and do the same setup, but with the moms holding their swaddled newborns,” Clayshulte said.
  • Financial services firm USAA is facing a backlash to its decision to pull advertising from Sean Hannity's show on Fox News Channel. The company says it is withdrawing its commercials from other opinion-based television shows. USAA caters to U.S. military members, veterans and their families, and its Facebook page was clogged Friday with messages from customers threatening to end their accounts. USAA is one of a reported nine companies to pull sponsorship from Hannity. The Fox personality has become a liberal target for his focus on a discredited story about a murdered Democratic National Committee staffer. An advocacy group noted that USAA has recently advertised on Rachel Maddow's MSNBC show. The company said that was a mistake, too.
  • The Latest on an arrest at Phoenix Comicon (all times local): 1:00 p.m. Phoenix police say there are indications an armed man arrested at Phoenix Comicon is mentally disturbed and that he told detectives he's a crime-fighting comic book character and planned to shoot bad police officers. Police also say in a probable-cause statement released Friday that officers took Mathew Enrique Nava Sterling into custody at the Phoenix Convention Center after somebody contacted Hawthorne, California, police to report that Sterling was posting threats on Facebook about killing police officers at the Comicon event. Court documents indicate Sterling lives in suburban Mesa and is 29. Sterling didn't have an attorney present during an initial court appearance Friday. He spoke only briefly, agreeing when a judge told him it might not be in his interest to comment. ___ This story has been corrected to show that court documents spell Sterling's first name as Mathew and indicate his age is 29. ___ 11:35 a.m. Phoenix Comicon security has greatly tightened with officials banning all prop weapons after police arrested an armed man who they say allegedly made threats to harm a performer and posted online threats against police officers. Massive crowds of attendees are experiencing heavy delays Friday as they wait hours in long lines before eventually going through added security screenings and entering the event. Comic book and science fiction fans are fervently complaining about the Phoenix Comicon organizers' sudden ban on costume prop weapons. They say the fake weapons are often essential in completing costumes and can be extremely costly to build or buy. Prop weapons include swords, sabers and fake guns. Police didn't identify the performer who allegedly was threatened but say the man arrested Thursday was Mathew Sterling. ___ This story has been corrected to show that court documents spell Sterling's first name as Mathew and indicate his age is 29. ___ 8:35 a.m. Police say a man who was armed with guns and ammunition when arrested at the Phoenix Comicon allegedly made threats to harm a performer at the event and posted online threats against police officers. Police didn't identify the performer who allegedly was threatened but say the man arrested Thursday was Mathew Sterling. His hometown wasn't released. Police say Sterling was taken into custody after a brief struggle at the entertainment and conic convention. Sgt. Mercedes Fortune says Sterling was jailed on suspicion of attempted murder, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, wearing body armor during the commission of a felony, resisting arrest and carrying a weapon in a prohibited place. Fortune says officers at Comicon were alerted to a suspicious man making threats against police on social media and the postings included photos of officers working the event. ___ This story has been corrected to show that court documents spell Sterling's first name as Mathew and indicate his age is 29.